Kyra Wiens is a professional triathlete, yoga teacher, and holds AN MPA FROM UNC - Chapel Hill.

She has finished in the top 10 of all her pro races over the last year, in addition to 12th at the 70.3 North american Championships and 23rd at the 70.3 world championships in South Africa.

It's really happening, I've gone pro!!

It's really happening, I've gone pro!!

A gift to myself following St. George: on Friday, USAT officially accepted me as a pro (or elite)!! It's so exciting to declare, out loud, this is what I'm passionate about and get to do it at the level of the heroines in this sport. 

I became a triathlete in 2013, soon after reading Chrissie Wellington's book, A Life Without Limits. Wellington writes about her last Kona as being the proudest moment of her career because it was also the one that demanded the most mental grit. "[T]he girls had forced me to dig to unexplored depths," she says.

And that's what I'm looking for: unexplored depths alongside other women. 

Also, much easier (and procrastinate-able) race registration.

There's one other thing I want to say about this. World Triathlon Corporation (WTC) has tried to justify their capricious discrimination—allowing 50 pro men to compete in Kona, but only 35 women—as a reflection of higher male participation in the sport. (My coach has a wonderful rebuttal to this degradation and why it unduly harms women, here.) We all can and should continue to speak out for #50womentoKona or #5Q.

But there's something more that age group women can do: we can choose to accept pro status when we qualify, swelling the ranks of pro women in the sport. Me, I'm not going to Kona anytime soon. But maybe, maybe I can help us meet WTC partway and get a 36th—a 37th—or #50womentoKona.


Thank you, Matthew Rose of Dynamo Multisport for getting me here on "our first rodeo together"; I'm so excited for where we'll ascend to next. Mom, Dad, Taryn, I love you. Sean, you were with me at the finish of St. George and taught me to dream again. Ignite, to be your teammate is to belong—and to have something to do on Friday nights.

Hoping for magic

Hoping for magic

{I'm} myself.

{I'm} myself.